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22Nov/16Off

Nikon D610 (Una Opción Económica Para Usuarios Avanzados)

Escoger cámara es una de las decisiones más complicadas que harás como fotógrafo. A pesar de que no nos hartamos de repetir que el “hábito no hace al monje”, es decir, que la cámara no hace al fotógrafo, lo cierto es que el momento de comprar una cámara es importante. Es importante saber qué uso […]

Este artículo aparece publicado originalmente Nikon D610 (Una Opción Económica Para Usuarios Avanzados) en Blog del Fotógrafo.

17Feb/16Off

Hands-On: The Pentax K-1 Full-Frame DSLR Is Here At Last

Back in October, Ricoh showed off a preproduction sample of the much-anticipated Pentax K-1 behind a glass enclosure at Photo Plus Expo in New York. Today, the long-awaited full-frame DSLR makes its debut along with two new lenses.

The K-1 is built around a 36.4MP CMOS sensor with an ISO range up to 204,800 and a five-axis image stabilization system for which Pentax has found a variety of creative uses. Like Ricoh's flagship APS-C model, the Pentax K-3 II, by moving its sensor in 1 pixel increments, the camera is able to simulate an anti-aliasing filter to fight moiré patterns. And it can use its built in GPS in tandem with the sensor’s stabilization unit to follow the movement of stars in the night sky—a boon for stellar photographers that Pentax calls its Astro Tracer.

The K-1 is launching into a market already well-stocked with full-frame DSLRs, so it incorporates a number of novel features that help it stand out. LCD screens on DSLRs that flip and rotate are fairly common, but Pentax has included what it calls a “flexible, tilt-type” monitor on its new flagship, which is anchored to the body of the K-1 by four struts. This unique system allows the rear screen to twist and angle in new ways, with up to 44 degrees of vertical and 35 degrees of horizontal adjustment.

A newly engineered pentaprism with about 0.7X magnification and almost 100% field of view provides a bright, crisp view through the lens. An innovative array of small LEDs throughout the body, above the lens mount, within the SD card slots and behind the rear LCD screen, should make using the camera in low-light situations much simpler. Heavy-duty shooters will also be interested in an optional battery grip ($199) for the K-1, which mirrors many of the right-hand controls on the back of the camera body.

Over at Pop Photo headquarters, we were lucky enough to get to shoot with a preproduction version of the camera with a working version of the firmware. While we had the K-1 only for a few hours, we quite enjoyed the time we had with it. In particular, the heft of the camera body, which weighs in at just over 2 pounds with a battery and SD cards, appealed to those of us used to working with heavier cameras. The deep right-hand grip and rubbery coating on the body made handling the K-1 comfortable and easy.

The K-1 is significantly more imposing and beefier than Pentax’s APS-C line of DSLRs, good news for those looking for a serious workhorse. The APS-C cameras like the K-5 II were well-regarded for their durability and that certainly seems to have carried over here to the top of the DSLR line. Its form-factor and design seem inspired by the success of the brand’s 645Z medium-format camera. The aesthetics in the K-1’s branding seem point to the way that Pentax views the relationship between the two camera systems and teases at more to come.

Surprisingly, the K-1 with its many new features, hits the street today at a cool $1,799 (body only), significantly cheaper than its closest competitor, Nikon’s D810 which sell for $2,800. Launching concurrently with the K-1, Pentax has also announced two new lenses for the body, a 15-30mm f/2.8 ($1,449) and a 28–105mm f/3.5–5.6 ($499). Both lenses, for which prices are not yet available, are weather-sealed and incorporate aspherical and low-dispersion elements to fight chromatic aberration and distortion. Ten other lenses for the system will also be available, ensuring a wide range of focal length possibilities for potential Pentax shooters.

We’re always happy when camera makers shake up the status quo and we look forward to seeing how photographers take to this new full-frame DSLR.

20Oct/15Off

Hands On with the Leica SL Mirrorless Camera

You’d likely be as impressed as I was when recently handed the new Leica SL. Overall this camera is quite a treat to shoot though it is not without its flaws and quirks. For one, the camera weighs more than 4.5 lbs with its 24-90mm lens attached.

The lens, which is more than half the weight of the camera, features a sturdy metal sheathing and ribbed rubber rings that are a pleasure to hold. The unusual focal range is delightfully versatile, functioning equally well for portraiture and landscapes. Sadly however, this zoom has variable f/stops (and not overly fast ones at that) ranging from f/2.8–4. With its flocked lens hood attached, the whole thing measures about 9 inches from the camera body when fully extended, so don’t expect to go un-noticed while walking around with one.

One of my favorite things about using the SL was the design of the camera body. The chassis is largely covered with a texturized leatherette that has the feel of canvas and its deep right-hand grip makes holding this beast a delight. The blocky and minimal design hearkens to Leica’s roots while feeling very contemporary at the same time.

In the past I’ve resisted using electronic viewfinders but Leica’s “EyeRes” EVF won me over after a couple of hours. The large 4.4 MP screen and 1.5 inch diameter eyepiece allow for an accurate and comfortable picture preview. You’ll find plenty of real estate for setting information and a small histogram although you can turn most of these off for a more “natural” shooting experience.

A square monochrome screen at the top of camera offers at-a-glance info about the camera settings: mode, f/stop, shutter speed, ISO, battery life, and shot count. The 3 inch touchscreen display on back of the body displays images with accurate brightness and color rendition that is easy to view even when in near-direct sunlight. Both the back screen and EVF can play back your images or operate in live view mode, switching handily via a sensor in the eyepiece when you hold it up to your face.

For Leica, the SL represents a foray into new territory as the configuration of its interface will attest. All of the 11 buttons on the body are unlabeled as most of them are user-configurable. Aside from the standard click-wheel and shutter-speed dial, you will find a small rubberized “joystick” that aids not only in quickly locking down your AF point but also in breezing through Leica’s truncated menu options. Four long plastic buttons flanking the rear screen are very much your sandbox to choose how you'd like to review and delete images or switch between menu options.

After offloading the images from the SL, I was impressed with their brightness and lack of chromatic aberration. The autofocus system delivered solid results with moving subjects and the out-of-the box sharpness and bokeh were both laudable. In the end, my only real qualm with the SL was with its playback zoom. While checking my focus during shooting I found that the camera was not able to fully resolve DNGs while zoomed. I was able to fix this easily however by switching to DNG + JPEG capture. Leica has since confirmed that a forthcoming firmware update will resolve the issue.

19Oct/15Off

Canon Shows Off Prototype Full-Frame Sensor With Super-High Sensitivity

Back a the Canon Expo last month in NYC, the company showed off quite a bit of interesting and cool new tech. There’s a similar expo going on in Paris at the moment and Canon is using that opportunity to roll out more info on some of their future products.

The 35mm full-frame sensor they’re touting in this video seems to be in the same family as their new ISO 4,000,000+ camera, the ME20F-SH. In order to show off the prototypes low-light chops, Canon sent it into a mysterious cave where thousands of glow worms light up the ceiling, giving it the appearance of stars in the sky.

The cave, as you might expect, is supremely dark, so the comparison shots with a commercial video camera and the new prototype are fairly impressive.

Low-light performance is clearly he battleground on which the camera war is currently being fought. Right now, Sony is pushing the limits on low-light with cameras like the A7S Mark II, but it has been good to see that Canon is pushing hard on their sensor tech as well.

14Oct/15Off

New Gear: Sony RX1R II Full-Frame Compact Camera Gets Faster AF and a Built-In Viewfinder

Sony RX1R II Full-Frame Compact Camera With Built-In EVF

To date, no one has really been able to match Sony’s feat of putting a full frame sensor into a tiny compact camera like they did with the RX1 and the RX1R. Now, they’re announcing the RX1R II, which includes some very notable upgrades.

The sensor itself has gotten a revamp, pushing the total resolution to 42.4-megapixels and keeping with the 35mm F/2 fixed lens on the front.The RX1R II has the most recent Sony Bionz processor, which allows it to push to a maximum ISO of 102,400 in its expanded modes, at the same time operating at 3.5x the speed of the original RX1R. It even turns out 14-bit raw images.

Sony RX1R II Full-Frame Compact Camera With Built-In EVF

The AF system has gotten a revamp and now includes 399 focal-plane phase-detection AF points that cover about 45% of the total image area. According to Sony, that’s the widest coverage on a full-frame sensor. In total, it results in a claimed 30% increase in overall AF performance from the original RX1R.

In front of the sensor is the “world’s first” optical variable low pass filter, which allows you to decide whether you want to squeeze out maximum resolution from your images by turning it off, or minimizing moire by leaving it on. You can even bracket the filter if you want to compare and choose later.

One of the most interesting developments to me is the addition of a retractable XGA OLED viewfinder with 2.4 million dots of resolution. That means it offers true eye-level shooting. It has a magnification of .74x. The LCD is a 3-inch LCD with 1.2 million dots of resolution. It can tilt up and down for composing at odd angles.

Sony RX1R II Full-Frame Compact Camera With Built-In EVF

Lastly, the camera has a variety of video recording options, including 1080p HD recording at up to 60 fps. It also has built-in Wifi and NFC for sharing, which is becoming more and more standard, especially in compact cameras.

The camera will cost $3,300, which is a lot, but that shouldn’t come as a surprise if you’re familiar with the lineage of the RX1R II and you also consider how much technology is packed into this tiny little package. The original RX1 and the RX1R were excellent little cameras and we’re eager to get our hands on a retail model so we can see how much difference the upgrades make in terms of image quality.

24Sep/15Off

Ricoh Announces High-Performance 24-70mm F/2.8 Zoom Lens For Upcoming Pentax Full-Frame DSLR

Pentax 24-70 full frame dslr lens

We’ve known that Ricoh has been developing a full-frame Pentax DSLR for a while now, but today they’re announcing a new weather-resistant lens meant to go with it. The HD Pentax-D FA 24–70mm f/2.8 ED SDM WR uses the K-mount and will be a key piece in Pentax’s move into the full-frame DSLR market.

The lens has three extra-low dispersion elements and four aspherical elements to fight the usual optical pitfalls like distortion and vignetting. The designers also applied a new multi-layer HD coating to cut down on ghosting and increase weather resistance. Of course, you can also use the lens on existing crop-sensor Pentax bodies, where it will act like a 37–107mm zoom.

As it stands, the new 24–70mm f/2.8 is everything you’d expect at one of the most classic focal ranges around. It’s a foundational piece of a modern full-frame DSLR system for many pros, a market Ricoh is hoping to attract with a full-frame Pentax DSLR. What’s not standard, however, is the price tag, which checks in at just $1,299. Sony, Canon, and Nikon all offer their flagship 24–70mm lenses at much higher prices.

We’ll give the new lens a full test as soon as possible, but this is promising news for the Pentax brand and its upcoming camera body. Affordable full-frame is still as desirable as ever.

11Sep/15Off

New Gear: Sony A7S II Gets 5-Way Image Stabilization, Internal 4K Video Recording

Sony A7S II full-frame camera with 4K Video

Sometimes, when a camera company introduces a new system, you have to wonder if they're going to give it the support it really needs to thrive. Sony, however, seems dead set on supporting their full-frame A-series cameras with a string of aggressive updates that continues today with the announcement of the A7S II.

The A7S II maintains some of the crucial pieces of the original version, using a 12.2-megapixel resolution that enables the insanely-high 400,000+ ISO performance. But, there have been some considerable upgrades. One big move is the addition of the 5-way internal image stabilization system like the one found in the A7 II.

Another big step up for the A7S II is the fact that it can now record 4K video straight to a memory card. The original A7S requires a separate video recorder to deal with all of that data that gets churned out when capturing super high-res video. Beyond that, it has full-pixel readout rather than relying on pixel binning, which means that it's capturing full data on each frame. That's a very notable difference if you're at all interested in pulling stills from 4K video to use as photos. Beyond 4K, it also does 120 fps at 100 Mbps at 1080p, which makes for some seriously high-quality slow-mo.

[embed https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=2

The upgraded AF system has 169 AF points, which promises better tracking and faster overall performance, even in low-light, which is a selling point for the A7S II in the first place. Even the electronic viewfinder has been revamped, givin git a higher magnification of .78x, so it too is easier to use in the dark.

All in all, the A7S II has received a lot of new features, making it a very worthy successor to the already-popular A7S, at least on paper. Right now, it's only officially announced in Europe, where it will carry a price of 3,400 Euro. We have no info about a US release just yet, but I have to imagine it's coming.

27Ago/15Off

¿Conoces el Factor de Conversión de tu Cámara Réflex? Aquí Te Lo Explicamos

Desde Blog del Fotógrafo queremos hacerte la vida (fotográficamente hablando) más fácil. Ese es el objetivo de cada uno de los artículos que escribimos. Por eso voy a dedicar la entrada de hoy a contarte de qué va eso del factor de recorte o factor de conversión del que seguro que has oído hablar o […]

Este artículo aparece publicado originalmente ¿Conoces el Factor de Conversión de tu Cámara Réflex? Aquí Te Lo Explicamos en Blog del Fotógrafo.

10Jul/15Off

Nikon Issues D750 Product Advisory For Possible Shading From Shutter

Nikon D750 Product Advisory Image Shading From Shutter

By almost all accounts, the Nikon D750 is a pretty killer DSLR. Now, however, Nikon has issued a service advisory because some D750 bodies are having an issue with the shutter causing shading in some photos.

If you follow this link, you can enter your camera’s serial number and check if it’s one of the included cameras.

If your camera fits the criteria for the issue, you can contact Nikon and they will evaluate the body and fix the issue for free, even if your warranty is up.

I haven’t heard all that much complaining on the web about the image shading issue, so it seems like this is Nikon being extra cautious, which is probably a good thing. They did take a lot of criticism for their D600 “oily sensor” issue, so it’s no surprise that they’re trying to stay ahead of any other possible problems.

Have any of you experienced this phenomenon? We’d love to see some examples of what it looks like.

2Jul/15Off

New Gear: Nikon DX 16-80mm F/2.8-4E ED VR, 500mm F/4 VR, and 600mm F/4 VR Lenses

New lenses are always exciting, and this morning, Nikon has three of them to offer. Here’s a brief rundown on each new lens.

jessicamarquardt1.jpg

AF-S DX Nikkor 16-80mm F/2.8-4E ED VR Designed for APS-C sensor bodies, this is meant to be the quintessential walk-around lens for crop-sensor Nikon bodies. The 5x optical zoom range gives the equivalent field of view of a 24-120mm lens, which should sound very familiar to Nikon full-frame shooters.

It has Nikon’s Nano Crystal Coat on the outside, with 17 elements in 13 groups on the inside. It even focuses down to 1.2-feet all the way through the zoom range, which makes it fairly versatile. Of course, Nikon has also built in their Vibration Reduction capabilities, which they claim are good for up to four extra stops of handheld shooting without camera shake.

One of my personal favorite additions, though, is the fluorine coating on the front and rear elements of the lens to help prevent it from collecting grime and smudges. Walk around lenses take a lot of a abuse, so the tougher they are, the better.

The lens will be available this month (July 2015) for $1,069, which seems just about what you’d expect.

jessicamarquardt2.jpg

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 500mm F/4E FL ED VR At 6.8-pounds, this telephoto monster might not sound light, but consider that it cuts more than two pounds off of its predecessor’s weight and it starts to sound very appealing. In addition to the weight reduction, it has also gotten some serious performance upgrades, including Nikon’s Electromagnetic Diaphragm, and elements made from fluorite and Extra Low Dispersion Glass.

Of course, it also has built-in VR with automatic tripod detection and a Sport VR mode that lets the camera pan without the VR screwing it up.

This is a pro lens and it comes with a pro-grade price tag of $10,299.

jessicamarquardt3.jpg

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 600mm F/4E FL ED VR The other massive telephoto lens in Nikon’s announcement this morning shares most of the same performance enhancements as its “little” sibling. The 600mm checks in at 8.3 pounds, which is more than three pounds lighter than the old version that came before it.

The 600mm lens will cost $12,299

10Jun/15Off

New Gear: Leica Q Is a Full-Frame Compact With a Fixed 28mm F/1.7 Prime Lens

The Leica Q has a full-frame sensor and a bright, fast fixed lens. It's a very powerful compact camera.
15Abr/15Off

Nikon D750

Nikon's mid-range full-frame camera is as versatile as they come…
15Abr/15Off

Nikon D750

Nikon's mid-range full-frame camera is as versatile as they come…
15Abr/15Off

Nikon D4s

Nikon has pushed the low-light limits of their flagship DSLR…
15Abr/15Off

Nikon D4s

Nikon has pushed the low-light limits of their flagship DSLR…
15Abr/15Off

Canon 5DS R

Canon's 50.6-megapixel DSLR minus the low-pass filter…
15Abr/15Off

Canon 5Ds

Rumors of Canon's massive 50-megapixel DSLR were circulating for months before it finally made its debut. With 50.6-megapixels, it's the highest-resolution full frame DSLR around and it uses Canon's 61-point AF system. Read the full announcement post here Product Specifications Camera Category: Pro DSLR Sensor Size: Full Frame Megapixels: 50.6 AF Points: 61 Maximum ISO: 12,800…
4Mar/15Off

Sample Image Gallery: Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

 Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

Tech Specs: ISO 200, 1/60 sec, f/1.4 Click for Full Res Photo: Philip Ryan
 Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

Tech Specs: ISO 200, 1/60 sec, f/1.4 Click for Full Res Photo: Philip Ryan
 Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

Tech Specs: ISO 400, 1/1600 sec, f/1.4 Click for Full Res Photo: Philip Ryan
 Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

Tech Specs: ISO 400, 1/100 sec, f/4 Click for Full Res Photo: Philip Ryan
 Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

Tech Specs: ISO 200, 1/160 sec, f/8 Click for Full Res Photo: Philip Ryan
 Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

Tech Specs: ISO 100, 1/400 sec, f/1.4 Click for Full Res Photo: Philip Ryan
 Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

Tech Specs: ISO 100, 1/1000 sec, f/1.4, Exposure Compensation +1 Click for Full Res Photo: Philip Ryan
 Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

Tech Specs: ISO 100, 1/100 sec, f/4, Exposure Compensation +1 Click for Full Res Photo: Philip Ryan
 Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

Tech Specs: ISO 200, 1/50 sec, f/8, Exposure Compensation +1 Click for Full Res Photo: Philip Ryan
 Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

Tech Specs: ISO 50, 1/2500 sec, f/1.4 Click for Full Res Photo: Philip Ryan
 Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

Tech Specs: ISO 50, 1/80 sec, f/8 Click for Full Res Photo: Philip Ryan
 Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

Tech Specs: ISO 500, 1/50 sec, f/8, Exposure Compensation -0.3 Click for Full Res Photo: Philip Ryan
 Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

Tech Specs: ISO 400, 1/80 sec, f/5.6, Exposure Compensation +0.3 Click for Full Res Photo: Philip Ryan
 Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Zeiss Distagon T* FE 35mm F1.4 ZA

Tech Specs: ISO 16000, 1/50 sec, f/1.4 Click for Full Res Photo: Philip Ryan

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