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5Nov/15Off

Lytro Immerge Is the Evolution of Light Field Photography

Lytro Immerge Virtual Reality Camera

When Lytro first introduced their camera in 2011, the idea of light field photography was new and pretty exciting. The promise of shooting a photo and then deciding on the focus point later was novel if nothing else. But, Lytro’s hardware never quite struck a chord in the market and the limited ability for sharing the interactive photos prevented it from taking hold with photographers. Now, however, the company is pivoting and putting a hard focus on virtual reality capture with their new Immerge system.

Like other virtual reality cameras, the Immerge is a sphere. However, rather than using a typical lens and sensor array, Lytro is still using light field technology, which adds a unique angle to virtual reality capture. The benefit being that it allows the viewers to move around a scene in a way they wouldn’t be able to with a static capture device. Lytro is calling that the Six Degrees of Freedom. Watching the video makes the concept a little more clear.

With their earlier hardware releases, Lytro was angling toward consumers, but the Immerge is very clearly aiming at bigger productions and even industrial uses. The camera itself is relatively massive and operating it requires an entire server of storage drives to parse the footage. They clearly don’t expect individuals to buy and use this thing and are currently accepting applications for studio partners.

Lytro Immerge Virtual Reality Camera

In the end, it’s a massive shift for Lytro in general. Yesterday, the Lytro Illum camera was available for $400 on Amazon, which is more than 75% off its original price. They're still selling the Illum on their site, but it's unclear how much support the product is going to get with this new product in town.

I really do think virtual reality imaging is going to be a huge thing going forward, but it’s going to be a crowded market with lots of players already heavily invested. Ricoh and their Theta camera have put VR capture into a pocket-sized device (though, it’s not nearly as advanced as the Lytro model) and the big tech players like Samsung, Facebook, and Google have already started picking sides.

Ultimately, the Immerge seems like very cool tech capable of some truly interesting things, but its success will ultimately hinge on its adoption and its accessibility, which may depend on other players going along.

I’m very curious to try it out and see some of the footage on a VR headset.

Official Site

9Jul/15Off

Lytro Announces Updates For Illum And Lytro Desktop

Lytro has announced updates to both the firmware for its Illum camera and its Lytro Desktop software for managing and manipulating the images that the company’s lightfield cameras produce.

For those unfamiliar with lightfield cameras, they use a set of microprisms on top of a standard sensor in order to capture light coming from various angles to create images that can be refocused, the depth of field changed, or perspective shifted after the fact, or create 3D images from one shot. The images can be viewed in viewers that let you interact with the images and can be embedded into web pages, or output as stills.

The Illum 2.0 firmware update adds, among other things, the ability to manipulate the lightfield images in the camera itself. Previously you could not adjust the photos in the camera itself after shooting. The update also adds a new interface with an improved depth gauge to help in placing your plane of focus while capturing images and to accommodate controls for adjusting images already shot. For instance, turning two fingers clockwise on the touchscreen can create a wider virtual aperture while a counterclockwise twist stops down the virtual aperture for increased depth of field. Dragging a finger around the screen performs a perspective shift. Finally, the new firmware updates the algorithms used for autofocus. Lytro says that the AF speed has been increased threefold compared to the original Illum.

Lytro Desktop 4.3 brings with it some integration with Adobe Photoshop. You can now export one of Lytro’s Living Pictures as editable image stacks with individual layers. Then you can edit any of the layers and when you save the file, those changes will automatically be applied to the image in Lytro Desktop.

Lytro has also added the ability to export a series of images with a focus range to send to a company that makes lenticular 3D prints. You now can also export stereoscopic side-by-side 3D animations directly from Lytro Desktop 4.3. These can be used for virtual reality playback in Google Cardboard, Samsung Gear VR, or other stereo viewers. Lytro Desktop will also now support Depth Map editing so Lytro shooters can touch up areas of their photos in a way that they couldn’t before. On a more utilitarian level, the updated software lets you import images without processing them, thereby speeding up the import process. You can simply select the best shots for processing immediately and return to other shots for processing at a later date.

Both updates are free and should be available for download now. For Lytro Ullum 2.0 you can plug lyt.ro/ILLUMCameraUpdate into your browser, while Lytro Deasktop 4.3 can be found here.

9Jul/15Off

Lytro Announces Updates For Illum And Lytro Desktop

Lytro has announced updates to both the firmware for its Illum camera and its Lytro Desktop software for managing and manipulating the images that the company’s lightfield cameras produce.

For those unfamiliar with lightfield cameras, they use a set of microprisms on top of a standard sensor in order to capture light coming from various angles to create images that can be refocused, the depth of field changed, or perspective shifted after the fact, or create 3D images from one shot. The images can be viewed in viewers that let you interact with the images and can be embedded into web pages, or output as stills.

The Illum 2.0 firmware update adds, among other things, the ability to manipulate the lightfield images in the camera itself. Previously you could not adjust the photos in the camera itself after shooting. The update also adds a new interface with an improved depth gauge to help in placing your plane of focus while capturing images and to accommodate controls for adjusting images already shot. For instance, turning two fingers clockwise on the touchscreen can create a wider virtual aperture while a counterclockwise twist stops down the virtual aperture for increased depth of field. Dragging a finger around the screen performs a perspective shift. Finally, the new firmware updates the algorithms used for autofocus. Lytro says that the AF speed has been increased threefold compared to the original Illum.

Lytro Desktop 4.3 brings with it some integration with Adobe Photoshop. You can now export one of Lytro’s Living Pictures as editable image stacks with individual layers. Then you can edit any of the layers and when you save the file, those changes will automatically be applied to the image in Lytro Desktop.

Lytro has also added the ability to export a series of images with a focus range to send to a company that makes lenticular 3D prints. You now can also export stereoscopic side-by-side 3D animations directly from Lytro Desktop 4.3. These can be used for virtual reality playback in Google Cardboard, Samsung Gear VR, or other stereo viewers. Lytro Desktop will also now support Depth Map editing so Lytro shooters can touch up areas of their photos in a way that they couldn’t before. On a more utilitarian level, the updated software lets you import images without processing them, thereby speeding up the import process. You can simply select the best shots for processing immediately and return to other shots for processing at a later date.

Both updates are free and should be available for download now. For Lytro Ullum 2.0 you can plug lyt.ro/ILLUMCameraUpdate into your browser, while Lytro Deasktop 4.3 can be found here.

12Dic/14Off

Lytro Focus Spread Technology Gives You Full Control Over Depth of Field After the Fact

Lytro Focus Spread

A simple slider lets you decide what's in focus and what's blurry

By now, you're almost certainly aware of the Lytro camera and it's interesting ability to allow users to select the focus point of their photo after it has already been shot. Now, they're taking that focus tweaking to the next level with something they call Focus Spread.

Basically, the image is split up into three different components, foreground, subject, and background, like you'd expect in a typical photograph. But, a slider in the new version (4.1) of their desktop software allows you to determine just how much depth of field you want. 
 
This is the type of thing that seems like it would come in extremely handy if you're doing something like macro photography, which has notoriously narrow depth of field, or family portraits where the people in the back aren't quite as sharp as those in the front.
 
The technology only works with files captured with the Lytro Illum camera, And while the results don't look quite as perfect as you'd expect from a traditional camera and typical depth of field, the sheer flexibility of it makes it seem very promising.
Lytro Focus Spread
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Lytro Split Focus

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11Dic/1176

Lytro. Enfoca después de tomar la foto.

SEQ_Lytro_Group_Front

Lytro ha presentado la cámara de fotos con la que es posible cambiar completamente el enfoque de la imagen después de haber sido obtenida. Desde que la compañía anunciara la tecnología, su objetivo "ha sido cambiar el modo de tomar fotografías" y con este modelo considera que se ha dado un gran paso".

A simple vista, la cámara tiene un diseño completamente diferente a la digital o convencional. El dispositivo alargado y pensado para utilizarse de forma "sencilla" solo dispone de dos botones: el del zoom (8x) y otro para tomar la foto. La pantalla táctil de 1,4 pulgadas permite que las imágenes se orienten directamente según la posición de la cámara.

Entre el resto de características destaca la velocidad "sin precedentes" que asegura un encendido y disparo instantáneo ya que al no necesitar autoenfoque ni tiene obturador. La cámara está disponible en dos colores y su memoria de almacenamiento puede ser de 8GB (350 imágenes) ó 16GB (750 imágenes), dependiendo del modelo. Está disponible en tres colores a un precio de 399 dólares.

Para aquellos que disfruten de la cámara, Lytro pone a su disposición un almacenamiento gratuito en su página web para subir las fotos realizadas en tu dispositivo.

Pero lo más importante es su tecnología y, precisamente, el cambio de enfoque a la hora de retratar. El dispositivo toma las imágenes con completa nitidez en todos los planos y después permite aplicar de forma sencilla desenfoques.

La cámara Lytro "captura la vida en fotografías vivientes", según la define la propia compañía. La tecnología ha sido creada por el doctor de la Universidad de Stanford, Ren Ng. Consiste en un sensor que captura 11 millones de rayos de luz de datos, incluyendo la dirección de cada rayo, algo que las cámaras convencionales no hacen. El motor del campo de luz entonces procesa los datos de la fotografía para poder modificarla por completo en postproducción.

Lytro permite compartir en línea las imágenes, de modo que cada usuario puede interactuar con la fotografía desde cualquier dispositivo incluyendo navegadores web, teléfonos móviles y tabletas, sin tener que descargar un software especial. De momento, el 'software' de la cámara únicamente está disponible para Mac, pero la empresa anuncia versiones para Windows y móviles.

La compañía además ha anunciado que permitirá que las fotos de Lytro Camera sean vistas en 3D. Según explica, "todas las imágenes tomadas con Lytro son "inherentemente en 3D". "Algoritmos de campos de luz especiales, disponibles en 2012, se  aplicarán al campo de luz de las imágenes para permitir que sean vistas en cualquier pantalla ·D".

 

Videos:

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Tecnología de la Lytro:

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Enlaces relacionados:

- Lytro: (http://www.lytro.com/).

- Galería de fotos Lytro: (http://www.lytro.com/living-pictures).

 

Fuente Texto: Europaress

Etiquetado con: 76 Comentarios