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Camaras Digitales Online Las Ultimas novedades en Camaras digitales.

3mar/15Off

Impossible Project Brings Instant Lab to Android Users and Round Frame Color 600 and SX-70 Film

Turn any smartphone or tablet image into a Polaroid print

It has been a few years since Impossible Project first released Instant Lab, a portable device which turned iPhone images into Instant Polaroid prints, and although the technology was very cool the initial release only worked with iPhones and iPod touches. Luckily for Android users, that is no longer the case. Today Impossible announced a new universal version of the Instant Lab, that works with all iOS and Android smartphones and tablets. 

This version features a flat-bed cradle for tablets, a variety of Andorid devices, iPhone 6 and 6 Plus it comes with a removable adaptor to keep Apple iPhone 4/s/5/s/c snuggly secured in place. For the first time the iOS Impossible Project app is available for Android. If you own the first generation Instant Lab you can pick up a cradle upgrade kit through Impossible’s web store for approximately $33 USD. The entire Intstant Lab will cost $249—a slight price drop from the original price of $299. 

In addition to an upgraded Instant Lab, Impossible has also released a new flavor of film. The Color Round Frame Polaroid will work with 600 and SX-70 cameras, and as the name suggests, will print instant pictures inside a circle within the borders of the square frame. The film comes with either white or black frames. The new round color film is $24.29 for a single pack and $69.99 for a triple pack. 

Instant Lab
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Instant Lab

Impossible Project brings the Instant Lab to Android users

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3mar/15Off

Nikon Releases the COOLPIX P900 with a Whopping 83x Zoom

This new compact puts the super in superzoom 

Nikon has just announced the new Coolpix P900, a superzoom that packs a crazy 83x optical zoom and will be available soon for $597.

The built-in lens has a 35mm equivalent focal length of 24mm when zoomed all the way out and a mind-blowing 2000mm when zoomed all the way in.

In case you wanted more, the camera also includes a 166x dynamic fine zoom that doubles your reach. If you lose sight of your subject while zoomed in, a snap-back zoom button allows for a quick zoomed-out view to regain focus.

To reduce camera shake at these extreme zooms, this model has Dual Detect Optical VR that provides up to five stops of compensation.

A 16MP CMOS image sensor delivers high-res images with low noise, and enables you to produce full HD 1080p videos. Video can be recorded at up to 60 fps with a built-in microphone, or at a high-speed option of 120 fps with reduced resolution.

To allow for two viewing options, the P900 feature a 3" 921k-dot vari-angle TFT-LCD screen with 6-level brightness adjustment, and a .2" 921k-dot electronic eye-level viewfinder for framing shots.

The P900 also has built in wi-fi, NFC, and GPS to quickly share your images and pinpoint the location where you shot them.

 

P900
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

P900

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3mar/15Off

Lowepro Announces Super High-End Echelon Camera Luggage

Lowepro Echelon Camera Bags

These limited-edition camera bags are meant for the first class overhead compartments

There are currently a lot of camera bag choices on the market. Seriously, just browsing the camera bag section on any popular camera store site can be a bit overwhelming. In order to stand out, Lowepro has created a three-piece camera luggage set that's designed to sit at the very high-end of their line-up. 
 
The Echelon series is actually a limited edition that's exclusively available directly from Lowepro. The trio includes a traditional rolling suitcase, a brief case, and a top-loading shoulder bag.
 
Each bag is made from 840 denier nylon exterior. I have no idea what that actually means, but I have actually had my hands on the bags and they feel extremely tough, and at the same time, have a really nice feel. They're almost a little shiny.
 
On the inside, they have the MaxFit System, which is meant to protect your gear, but they have classed it up for the Echelon series, adding leather tipping and a satin nylon lining to the dividers.
 
The roller has several large accessory pockets and holds a rather impressive amount of gear. I'm currently writing the review and I realize I have to dig out extra camera gear just to take a photo of it full. 
 
Because this is Lowepro's "luxury" product, it also comes with a luxury price tag. The Roller costs a hefty $800, while the shoulder bag runs $420, and the brief case is $340. If you want to buy the whole set, you can do so for $1,300.
 
The bags were actually designed with photographer (and all-around nice guy) Blair Bunting. Look for a full review of the set coming in the next few weeks. So far, it seems excellent, if a bit pricy.
 
Official Site
Lowepro Echelon Camera Bags
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Lowepro Echelon Camera Bags

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3mar/15Off

Sandisk’s 200 GB MicroSD Card Is Tiny, Massive

Sandisk 200 GB microSD Card

This little beast holds about 45,000 smartphone photos

Sandisk has a penchant for pushing out world's firsts in terms of memory cards and their massive 200 GB microSD card is no exception.
 
The tiny little card costs $400 and was announced at the Mobile World Conference in Spain this week. While 200 GB doesn't sound all that mind blowing when it comes to standard memory cards anymore, jamming all that into a microSD that's smaller than your average corn flake is pretty impressive. 
 
If you were to stick the card into a Samsung Galaxy S5 smartphone, you could store roughly 45,000 photos before it got full. It's also notable because now that GoPro cameras use MicroSD and shoot space-hungry 4K video, big capacities cards are a welcome development.
 
Frankly, I have to wonder if microSD will ever make its way into dedicated cameras. They're getting smaller all the time and microSD is making strides in both speed and capacity. I'm still partial to the big, tough compact flash cards, but that's just because I'm an old dinosaur and that's what I started with. 
Sandisk 200 GB microSD Card
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Sandisk 200 GB microSD Card

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3mar/15Off

Cómo Capturar Fotografías Con Alto Contraste de Luz

03¿Cuántas veces has salido exultante de energía en un maravilloso día soleado, cámara en mano, decidido a fotografiar todo lo que te rodea, pensando que no has podido encontrar mejor día, con un cielo más azul y un sol más brillante allá en lo alto… y ha resultado el día que peores imágenes has conseguido? […]

Este artículo aparece publicado originalmente Cómo Capturar Fotografías Con Alto Contraste de Luz en Blog del Fotógrafo.


2mar/15Off

New Gear: Sigma 24mm F/1.4 DG HSM Art Prime Lens and 150-600mm F/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary Super-Telephoto Zoom

Sigma 24mm F/1.4 DG HSM Art Prime Lens
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Sigma 24mm F/1.4 DG HSM Art Prime Lens

Sigma 24mm F/1.4 DG HSM Art Prime Lens
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Sigma 24mm F/1.4 DG HSM Art Prime Lens

Sigma 24mm F/1.4 DG HSM Art Prime Lens
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Sigma 24mm F/1.4 DG HSM Art Prime Lens

Sigma 24mm F/1.4 DG HSM Art Prime Lens
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Sigma 24mm F/1.4 DG HSM Art Prime Lens

Sigma 150-600mm F/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Super-Telephoto Zoom
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Sigma 150-600mm F/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Super-Telephoto Zoom

Sigma 150-600mm F/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Super-Telephoto Zoom
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Sigma 150-600mm F/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Super-Telephoto Zoom

Sigma 150-600mm F/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Super-Telephoto Zoom
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Sigma 150-600mm F/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Super-Telephoto Zoom

Sigma 150-600mm F/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Super-Telephoto Zoom
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Sigma 150-600mm F/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Super-Telephoto Zoom

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2mar/15Off

Reader Survey: The Best Places to Photograph

Tell us where you've shot and why you loved it

Every year Popular Photography ranks the best places in the world to photograph, but this year we've decided to do something a little different and turn to our readers for their expertise. 

We want you to rate the places where you have traveled to shoot. How friendly were the locals? How safe did you feel? And, most importantly, did you love the pictures you came home with? 

Results will be published in the June issue of Popular Photography. Tell us more about your favorite photo destinations here. 

Travel
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Travel

Machu Picchu, Peru Photo: Flickr-user Max Reiser (Creative Commons)

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2mar/15Off

New HTC One M9 Features 20-Megapixel Camera

No release date yet, but this Android's updated camera sounds pretty fancy

Yesterday HTC announced their latest flagship to their smartphone line: the One M9. The new phone features an all-metal design similar to the M8 and is about the same size, but this new Android has tons of small internal changes that beef up its camera capabilities. 

The rear-facing camera features a 20-megapixel sensor with an f/2.2, 27.8mm sapphire cover lens. Those increased pixels also mean this phone will be able to record 4K video. The front facing camera includes HTC's UltraPixel technology, which according to the company, sucks up to 300% more light then other cameras—making selfies shot in dark places look less terrible. The phone comes with 32 GB of internal storage and can support up to an additional 128 GB.

Still no word on pricing for the new phone or an official release date, but HTC says the phone will be available in the US this Spring. 

 

HTC
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

HTC

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2mar/15Off

15 Recursos Para “Dominar la Luz” en Tus Fotografías

En fotografía, si no hay luz, apaga y vámonos. Dejando de lado mis chistes malos, muchos fotógrafos se centran en adorar la máquina, en exhibir una GRAN cámara réflex colgada al cuello, o en conseguir que tu próxima cámara réflex tenga más cantidad de megapíxeles que la del vecino. Pienso que la fotografía es mucho más que […]

Este artículo aparece publicado originalmente 15 Recursos Para “Dominar la Luz” en Tus Fotografías en Blog del Fotógrafo.


28feb/15Off

Reto Semanal 98: Barrido

En esta ocasión te reto a seguir algo o a alguien con tu cámara y lograr que salga nítido mientras el fondo aparezca completamente movido. ¿Aceptas el reto? ¿Cómo Funciona? (Recordatorio) Cada semana propondré un nuevo reto, se trata de un tema que tendréis que plasmar en una fotografía y subirla a la página de Facebook del […]

Este artículo aparece publicado originalmente Reto Semanal 98: Barrido en Blog del Fotógrafo.


27feb/15Off

Zack Arias Gives an In-Depth How-To for Shooting Photos Against a White Background

Tips For Photography Against a White Background

A great lesson in one of photography's most deceptively tricky techniques

Shooting a photo in front of a clean white background seems like it should be the easiest thing in the world. Then, you actually try it. There are odd shadows everywhere and the background refuses to look even. Then, you blow out the background and get odd fringes on your subject. Or, the whole thing just looks gray. Lighting guru Zack Arias, has put together some extensive video tutorials on how to get effective shots against a white backdrop and it's worth watching if you don't have this type of shot on lock.
 
 
There's a surprising amount of subtlety involved with getting everything just right and Zack does a really good job of explaining it. So, give it a watch and then give it a try. It will probably take a few tries before you're feeling like Richard Avedon, but photography is a wonderful and sometimes frustrating process. That's part of why we love it.
 
Tips For Photography Against a White Background
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Tips For Photography Against a White Background

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27feb/15Off

Building Photos: How to Craft Amazing Architectural Shots

Experts weigh in on how to perfect structural shooting

As humans, and as photographers, we’re drawn to structures. Cloud-kissing skyscrapers, simple suburban houses, cathedrals, ramshackle garden sheds—any kind of structure can make a great subject. Here, four masters of the genre explain how to make your architectural photographs soar.  

“It’s what makes us human,” says Adrian Gaut of our fascination with making pictures of our structures, “the ability to transcend the environment.”

Adrian Gaut went digital with this image from his series photographing Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles, CA. Shot just before his switch to Nikon, with the Canon EOS 5D Mark III and 70-200 f/4L Canon EF lens. Exposure: 1/500 sec at f/18, ISO 400. 

Gaut, a New York City–based commercial pro, represents a breed of architectural photographers who make pictures not primarily for a design firm, but as part of larger projects or personal work. 

Such artists combine their literal representations of buildings with an overlay of metaphor. As Christopher Griffith, also based in New York, puts it, photographing architecture is “a testament to the idea, the sensation, that it’s even possible to build these kinds of things—the sort of awe that human beings have at the ability to create [them].”

Anyone who feels this awe can learn to express it in photographs.

Developing a Style

Your point of view, both in terms of where you set your camera and what the structure means to you, will be a defining feature of your architectural photographs. Shoot to find out what you are drawn to, and go from there. 

Gaut’s style, for example, is dominated by angles and a closer perspective than is typically seen in architectural photography—a characteristic born of necessity. He had purchased a used 4x5 rig on eBay that he thought came with a 90mm lens (extra-wide on this large-format camera), but in fact was outfitted with a 210mm (short telephoto) lens. “At the time I couldn’t afford to buy other lenses,” he says. “So I started shooting with the longer lens and found I was able to get something more unique, and more consistent with my vision of architecture. It also allowed me to shoot buildings that I considered not necessarily interesting as a whole—but [whose details] held a lot of potential. Once I could afford more lenses, I still felt connected with that way of working.”

Ashok Sinha captured these curves, above, using a Canon EOS 5D Mark II and 16-35mm f/2.8L Canon EF Lens. Exposure was 1/30 sec at f/4, ISO 320. 

If Gaut is all about angles, Ashok Sinha, another New York–based photographer, is all about curves. His picture of the staircase in the Frank Gehry–designed Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto is above. “I find a curve to be a strong visual element, especially for architecture, where everything is [usually] very straight. It adds a bit of flavor to the pictures—it makes them pop.”

Seats by Christopher Griffith; shot with a 4x5 Linhof Master Technika Camera, 150mm Rodenstock lens, Kodak Portra 400 film. 

Griffith, in the meantime, focuses on repeating patterns, as can be seen in his shot of the Shanghai Grand Theatre.

Matthias Haker, a Dresden-based commercial photographer, is clearly drawn to spirals and tubes, as can be seen in his photo of a station in the London underground. “I’m fascinated by spiral staircases,” he says. “It’s a typical situation that I photograph a spiral staircase in some office building. . .and as the people who work there see me lying on the floor, they start to look up and actually realize how beautiful it [is]—even though they’re used to seeing it every day.”

The lesson? Think about what visual elements in the built environment most draw your own eye, and frame the scene in
a way that brings these elements to the forefront.

Matthias Haker went underground for this image. Sony A900 and 17-35mm f2.8-f/4 Konica Minolta AF lens; exposure 1/10 sec at f/3.5, ISO 200. 

Finding Subjects

Identifying structures to photograph is “a mixture of serendipity and some planning,” Gaut says. “I travel a lot, and sometimes I’ll have a list of things that look interesting, sometimes from guidebooks. Sometimes I’ll file subjects away for future trips, but I’ve always got my eyes open.” His advice: Take a look at the building next to the one you were interested in. “Sometimes flagship buildings by major architects are less interesting than the ones that don’t get the press.”

For the image above, Sinha had a free day in Toronto on a commercial shoot, so he headed out. “I always love going to art galleries. The Art Gallery of Toronto is not only known for the collections but the architecture in general. And I had always wanted to see Gehry’s staircases.” 

Like these two photographers, Haker tends to research buildings to photograph for his personal work, which he does on top of commercial assignments. “Before I travel, I spend a lot of time searching online for places of interest,” he says. “Photo communities have made that research easy. Besides those, I check books about architecture as well as architectural websites or forums.”

But some shooters find subjects without much of a search—you just have to look up. With mundane buildings, the challenge lies in transforming them through photography. “I’m never particularly concerned about the representation of reality,” Griffith says. “It’s very rare that I look at a building and say, ‘I want to be true to how it sits and lives in the environment and the horizon.’ I’m much more about how the three-dimensional world fits into a two-dimensional box. I’m always trying to make things look larger than life, more monumental.” 

Adrian Gaut used a Pentax 6x7 camera and 75mm f/4.5 Pentax SMC lens to record the building and pattern of repeating light and shadow. Film: Kodak Tri-X 320. Exposure: 1/500 sec at f/16.

Selecting Gear 

Because these four photographers are busy pros, they work a wide variety of jobs. And so they have settled on full-frame DSLRs and ILCs, primarily with zoom lenses. Gaut uses the Nikon D810-series cameras; Sinha prefers the Canon EOS 5D series; and Haker is a Sony man, working with Alpha 900, Alpha 7R, and Alpha 99.

“It gives me the right amount of flexibility across a lot of different jobs,” Gaut says of a full-frame DSLR system. “Still life, portraits, aerial—it’s a real boon for me.” For architectural work, he commonly uses a longer-than-expected 70–200mm f/2.8 AF Zoom Nikkor.

Griffith is the outlier of the bunch. For his architectural studies he uses a 4x5 Linhof Master Technika, Rodenstock lenses, and—take a deep breath—film. Architectural work is, he says, “oddly enough, not something that I necessarily make a living at. I do it for myself. There’s no crew, there’s no producer; it’s you and a 4x5 camera. It lets you get back to a solitary way of shooting.” 

While for most of his commercial work, he’s all digital (Nikon As humans, and as photographers, we’re drawn to structures. Cloud-kissing skyscrapers, simple suburban houses, cathedrals, ramshackle garden sheds—any kind of structure can make a great subject. Here, four masters of the genre explain how to make your architectural photographs soar. By Dan Richards and D810s and a Hasselblad H4 with Leaf back), for personal work he likes shooting with film because, he says, it “forces you to make decisions. I can shoot everything under the sun if I shoot digital. With film, I’ll shoot two or three things and I’m done.” Griffith does make one concession to speed—he uses a Linhof viewfinder, similar to cinematographers’ framing optics, to establish starting compositions. 

Making Decisions 

Christopher Griffith captured this section of the Oriental Pearl Radio & TV Tower using his 4x5 Linhof Master Technika camera and a 90mm Rodenstock lens. Film: Kodak Tri-X 400. 

None of our four shooters are equipment-obsessive. As with most types of photography, making a great architectural image depends not on the subject or the gear you shoot it with but on the decisions you make while shooting. For that, these pros offer some nuggets of wisdom. 

“Work with the equipment that you have, the equipment you’re comfortable with, and find an approach that works for you—in my case, shooting with longer lenses,” says Gaut. 

Sinha urges you to pay attention to light. “I’m always observing light,” he says. “I am always making notes about light and looking at the shadows.” And don’t shy away from backlight. As he points out in his picture of the Frank Gehry staircase, the backlight coming from the ceiling and glinting off the wooden banisters defines the form. 

Griffith has an unusual piece of advice: Shoot less. During a location still-life workshop he led, he directed participants to limit the number of pictures they would take in any given session to 50 clicks. As everyone was shooting digital, he relied on the honor system. “It’s like having 50 sheets of film,” he says. “That kind of discipline, and those kinds of exercises, really force you to home in on not the picture that you can take, but the picture that you want to take. The problem [with digital] is that it doesn’t hone your eye. I’m guilty of this as well. I’ll be shooting a commercial job, and after a day I’ll have shot 800 to a thousand pictures—how the hell did I shoot that many? This is not an anti-digital argument at all. It’s purely the exercise of patience, the patience of taking photographs and forcing yourself to really make decisions.”

“You don’t need amazing buildings to make interesting pictures,” adds Gaut. “The big lesson is to work with what you have and go from there. You can take a great picture with a so-so lens—if you’ve got the vision.”

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26feb/15Off

New Gear: Leica M-P Edition ‘Safari’

Leica M-P Edition Safari

This special edition Leica is actually built to resist wear

Leica has more fancy cameras to announce this week in addition to their pre-worn 'Correspondent.' The Leica M-P Edition 'Safari' is a little less controversial and still very pretty.
 
The camera is a pretty standard M-P, but it has a hard-wearing, olive green enamel finish that helps protect it from the elements. That's actually sort of funny when you compare it to their other camera that comes pre-tarnished. 
 
Leica actually has a long history of 'Safari' edition cameras, with that Olive green coloring going back several decades in the M-series. 
 
The camera comes with the Summicron-M 35mm F/2 ASPH lens, which is nice and compact for a travel camera. As you might expect, there are even more stylish flourishes in the package, including a cowhide strap and wallet for holding memory cards. 
 
 
As always, it's a limited Leica, so it will be very expensive, but we don't have to tell you that by now. If you were going to splurge for one, would you go green or get the classic black? I know which way I'd lean.
 
Official Site
Leica M-P Edition Safari
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Leica M-P Edition 'Safari'

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26feb/15Off

Objetivos Recomendados Para Practicar Fotografía Nocturna

Cuentan la mayoría de leyendas que los seres más fantásticos surgen al amparo de la luz de la luna. Al parecer, cuando el sol deja de calentar y hace mutis por el foro o, lo que es lo mismo, desaparece tras la línea del horizonte, de su escondite salen duendes, hadas y demás seres mágicos, […]

Este artículo aparece publicado originalmente Objetivos Recomendados Para Practicar Fotografía Nocturna en Blog del Fotógrafo.


24feb/15Off

Canon EOS M: Pequeña Cámara Compacta, Con “GRANDES” Resultados

Si eres aficionado a estar a la última en tendencias fotográfico-tecnológicas, ya te habrás dado cuenta que cada vez hay más marcas que apuestan por modelos compactos, ligeros, de óptica intercambiable, y promesas de calidad réflex en diminutas cámaras compactas sin espejo. Hace ya algún tiempo que existen algunas marcas en el mercado con cámaras […]

Este artículo aparece publicado originalmente Canon EOS M: Pequeña Cámara Compacta, Con “GRANDES” Resultados en Blog del Fotógrafo.


23feb/15Off

The Massive Shortcut-S Keyboard Tries to Speed Up Photoshop and Lightroom Workflow

Shortcut-S Keyboard for Adobe Lightroom Kickstarter

Become the king of Photoshop and Lightroom shortcuts

About a year ago, I wrote about a Kickstarter for and impressively massive keyboard called the Shortcut-S, which had a ton of keys that represent Photoshop shortcuts. Apparently there was quite a bit of interest in that kind of product, because now Shortcut-S is back on Kickstarter once again with 14 different keyboards to represent different types of software.
 
For photographers, they have added a Lightroom keyboard to the already-existing Photoshop model. They also support Premiere Pro, Final Cut, and After Effects for video editing, as well as Aperture, which seems a little odd since it's pretty much going away soon.
 
Beyond that, they now have boards to support Illustrator and InDesign, as well as Word, Excel, Outlook, and (believe it or not) Facebook.
 

This is the Photoshop version of the Shortcut-S
 
They keyboards themselves look a bit insane, but if you consider some of the finger Twister some shortcuts require, it starts to seem more reasonable. When I mash down the command, options, and shift keys to Save for Web the photo for this post, it would certainly be easier just to use one button. Of course, I'd have to find that button on the massive 325-key keyboard, but I'd get used to it. 
 
The keys are all put in color-coded groups to make finding them among the army of buttons a little quicker. I already have a wedding to edit for this year, so I would actually be interested in trying something like this for Lightroom to see if it speeds up my process.
 
If you want a single Pro keyboard, you can get in on the Kickstarter for $129, but if you want more, they offer a ton of packages in case you want to dedicate yourself to having a big, crazy keyboard for every single program you use.
 
What do you think? Would you make room for something like this on your desk? 
Shortcut-S Keyboard for Adobe Lightroom Kickstarter
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Shortcut-S Keyboard for Adobe Lightroom Kickstarter

The Lightroom-specific version of the Shortcut-S keyboard

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23feb/15Off

Trucos Fáciles Para Conseguir Seductoras Fotografías (Ejemplos Incluidos)

Nos encanta seducir. Fotográficamente me refiero. Es cierto que contemplar una fotografía nuestra terminada nos llena de satisfacción, pero el orgullo que sentimos a la hora de compartirla y ver la expresión de asombro y admiración en la cara de los demás, eso es una sensación gratificante que no tiene precio. Fotografiar es sobre todo comunicar. El […]

Este artículo aparece publicado originalmente Trucos Fáciles Para Conseguir Seductoras Fotografías (Ejemplos Incluidos) en Blog del Fotógrafo.


21feb/15Off

Reto 97: Hora Azul

Esta semana el protagonista del reto es la hora azul. Vivas en el campo o en ciudad, ¡mira el cielo y dispara! ¿Cómo Funciona? (Recordatorio) Cada semana propondré un nuevo reto, se trata de un tema que tendréis que plasmar en una fotografía y subirla a la página de Facebook del blog poniendo en la descripción la […]

Este artículo aparece publicado originalmente Reto 97: Hora Azul en Blog del Fotógrafo.


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